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Home Health Financial Struggles Threaten Free Heart Treatment at KP's Premier Cardiology Hospital

Financial Struggles Threaten Free Heart Treatment at KP's Premier Cardiology Hospital

PIC now fears it may have to discontinue providing free treatment services through health cards, starting as early as next month, owing to outstanding payments from a private insurance company.
by TNN Editor - 28 Sep, 2023 1761
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Zeeshan Kakakhel

The Peshawar Institute of Cardiology (PIC), the sole cardiology hospital in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), like many others in the region, faces severe financial hardships due to prolonged funding shortages. The hospital now fears it may have to discontinue providing free treatment services through health cards, starting as early as next month, owing to outstanding payments from a private insurance company.

In a letter addressed to the health department, PIC referred to a meeting conducted the previous month. The hospital's communication highlights the health department's commitment to settling the dues owed to the private insurance firm. However, despite these assurances, the payments have not been made, leading to the accumulation of arrears amounting to Rs 1248 million.

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The mounting arrears pose a growing concern for PIC. It is the sole healthcare facility in the province offering free treatment for heart diseases, incurring substantial costs for each patient. Additionally, the hospital's essential medicine stock is rapidly depleting, with only one month's supply remaining. Suppliers have halted further deliveries due to the non-release of funds, resulting in arrears of Rs 900 million.

While the hospital can manage day-to-day operations with funds received from the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government, it lacks the means to continue cardiology surgeries beyond the immediate future.

In response to inquiries, the hospital's spokesperson and administration emphasized the exceptional, no-cost healthcare services provided to patients holding health cards. They reported a daily average of 6 to 8 surgeries, along with 60 to 70 angiography and angioplasty procedures. Regarding funding, they have made appeals to the government for the release of essential funds. The ongoing delay in disbursement has placed significant strain on the hospital's administration and operations.